Diet – Ick-theology

This station is designed to get students to begin to think about their diet as an integral part of their health. Our diets may be culturally constrained, but we are in control; we can balance our own diets for a healthier tomorrow. These exercises are intended to engage students in a dietary discussion and introduce them to a career as a dietician, nutritionist, health advertiser or Food Scientist. The Balancing Act is a balancing game the students will play to further understand the concept of balancing their diets. Using the Harvard Healthy Eating Plate as their guideline, students will balance different “foods” on a pizza pan. One student will start the game by balancing the pan on their fist. Another student, the “dietician”, will begin to add various “foods” (bean bag weights) to their respective locations. For example, a whole wheat bread weight will be placed in the designated “Whole Grains” section, while an apple weight will be placed in the designated “Fruits” section. The students will notice that a pan that is missing weights on a specific section will be difficult to balance, just like a diet without vegetable or without lean protein. Did you ever eat a cricket or cookies made of cricket flour? Here is your opportunity.

Diet Outline (PDF 783 KB)
Diet Outline (PDF 783 KB)

The Balancing Act

  • There will be artificial food that the students can place on their plate.
  • The plate will be easy to balance with healthy foods.
  • Any food that does not belong on the healthy plate will go on the edge, making the plate harder to balance, or even flipping the plate.

Items Needed per Plate

  • ❏ 1 Whole Grain Bread Container
  • ❏ 1 Whole Natural Almond Container
  • ❏ 6 Green Balloons
  • ❏ 5 Orange Balloons
  • ❏ 3 Red Balloons
  • ❏ 1 White Bread Container
  • ❏ 1 Gatorade
  • ❏ 1 Caramel/Honey Almond Container
  • ❏ 1 Cookie Package
  • ❏ 2 Fruit Snack Packages
Healthy Plate

The Balancing Act is a balancing game the students will play to further understand the concept of balancing their diets. Using the Harvard Healthy Eating Plate as their guideline, students will balance different “foods” on a pizza pan. One student will start the game by balancing the pan on their palm. Another student, the “dietician”, will begin to add various “foods” (bean bag weights) to their respective locations. For example, a whole wheat bread weight will be placed in the designated “Whole Grains” section, while an apple weight will be placed in the designated “Fruits” section. The students will notice that a pan that is missing weights on a specific section will be difficult to balance, just like a diet without vegetable or without lean protein. The students will also notice that there is no designated section on the pan for unhealthy, highly processed foods such as chocolate cookies, white bread, or hot dogs. These items will have to be placed outside of the designated area, signaling that food choices such as these can be eaten in addition to a balanced diet and cannot replace dietary needs. These items will also weigh significantly more than their healthy counterparts, thus making them quite difficult to balance. The unhealthy items will be easier to balance once a pan is balanced nutritionally and will send the pan crashing down if it is not.

 

The Balancing Act will be fun, interactive, and educational.

 

Students will begin the nutrition station with the Balancing Act. This will allow them to make mistakes and learn through the activity. It will be a fun introduction to the station.